basedjane

every day they want you to shrink:

fit here, in my palm, in my shadow, don’t be bigger than my idea of you, don’t be more beautiful than i can accept, don’t be more human than i am willing to allow you to be and be quiet, you’re too loud, even your unbelonging is loud. quiet your dreams, your voice, your hair, quiet your skin, quiet your displacement, quiet your longing, your colour, quiet your walk, your eyes. who said you could look at me like that? who said you could exist without permission? why are you even here? why aren’t you shrinking? i think of you often. you vibrate. you walk into a room and the temperature changes. i lean in and almost recognise you as human. but, no. we can’t have that.

Warsan Shire, Be Small For Me. (via basedjane)
wheretruthechoes

brentknepper:

It’s been an incredibly difficult five days with what’s happened in what I look at as my back yard. Last night watching the live feeds of what was happening in Ferguson, MO was absolutely unbelievable and I spent the entire night refreshing twitter feeling total shame and despair.

Today though, across the country there were little glimpses of light at this very dark tunnel. Being consumed by this level of anger feels exhausting, and take that with an incredibly huge grain of salt because that’s just what I with the privilege of being a white male am capable of feeling. I’m not capable of comprehending the real pain. At today’s NMOS14 demonstration in Chicago, an incredible number of people gathered on short notice. The assembly was peaceful. We listened to people express their hurt, their hope, their anger, and their drive to change things. Once my camera died (again, short notice on this rally), I biked straight to my computer to share the solidarity- if only here in Chicago.

I know this isn’t really the stuff I normally post on here, but I figure the one time I’m literally crying while taking pictures is probably a good time to post stuff. My gratitude goes to everyone organizing today, and not just here but everywhere.

nenasoulfly
oreeoriginol:

On Saturday, a Ferguson, Missouri police officer shot and killed an unarmed young black man by the name of Michael Brown. Michael was walking down the street with his friend when a police officer pulled over and asked them to get on the sidewalk. After the teenagers dismissed the officer’s request, he began to scuffle with Michael from out his patrol car. When Michael tried to run away, the officer fatally shot Michael several times despite his hands being raised in the air as a universal sign of non aggression and surrender. The incident has caused several protests and looting in Ferguson but the real story is the unjust killing of another black man in this country by police. This comes on the heels of the killing of Eric Garner and John Crawford. It has become a daily occurrence where police in this country are involved in the killing and harassment of innocent civilians. The police mantra is to “serve and protect”, but it seems apparent that when dealing with black people it is to “kill or be killed”. There is a real war being waged by the system on black and brown communities and it is time to stop turning the other cheek and start responding with rage. 

oreeoriginol:

On Saturday, a Ferguson, Missouri police officer shot and killed an unarmed young black man by the name of Michael Brown. Michael was walking down the street with his friend when a police officer pulled over and asked them to get on the sidewalk. After the teenagers dismissed the officer’s request, he began to scuffle with Michael from out his patrol car. When Michael tried to run away, the officer fatally shot Michael several times despite his hands being raised in the air as a universal sign of non aggression and surrender. The incident has caused several protests and looting in Ferguson but the real story is the unjust killing of another black man in this country by police. This comes on the heels of the killing of Eric Garner and John Crawford. It has become a daily occurrence where police in this country are involved in the killing and harassment of innocent civilians. The police mantra is to “serve and protect”, but it seems apparent that when dealing with black people it is to “kill or be killed”. There is a real war being waged by the system on black and brown communities and it is time to stop turning the other cheek and start responding with rage. 

nenasoulfly

nenasoulfly:

ishyagrrrl:

image

Yesterday I got a call from my sister Cheeraz Gormon in St. Louis who was standing with poet Elizabeth Vega. They wanted me to know that a few women had created, on lawns, in the streets, healing stations, a place where the youth could come and scream and cry and be held and heard in love. Mighty work.Dream Hampton

this made me cry.

Exhale | thank you to these women for creating space!

Powerful! This generation is so full of inherited rage. See it daily and it just baffles me, but it makes too much sense. 

auradacity-of
journolist:

National Moment of Silence 2014

On August 14, 2014, citizens across America will gather in solidarity to hold vigils and observe a moment of silence to honor victims of Police Brutality
Police Brutality in the United States continues to be a pervasive problem that affects communities across the country. In recent years, we have had news of too many people losing their lives as a result of police brutality. We have also heard too many stories of people being sexually and otherwise physically assaulted by police. We are gathering together to observe a National Moment of Silence to pay respect to the lives lost and/or forever changed by the brutality of the police state.Too many citizens have suffered. Their families and friends need our positive energy and support in this moment of anger, frustration, fear, and helplessness.

How the #NMOS14 Began: 

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

Vigils: 

Annapolis, Maryland 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
Bloomington, Indiana 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Bremerton, Washington 
Brooklyn, New York 
Carson City, Nevada 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Chicago, Illinois 
Columbia, South Carolina 
Columbus, Ohio 
Dallas, Texas 
Denver, Colorado 
Detroit, Michigan 
Durham, North Carolina 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Kansas City, Missouri
Knoxville, Tennessee  
Lansing, Michigan 
Long Island, New York 
Los Angeles, California 
Lower Manhattan, New York 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Nashville, Tennessee 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Orlando, Florida
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Portland, Maine 
Providence, Rhode Island 
Rochester, New York 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Antonio, Texas 
San Francisco, California 
Seattle, Washington 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Tampa, Florida 
Valdosta, Georgia
Vancouver, Canada 
Washington, D.C.
West Palm Beach, Florida 
Woodbridge, Virginia 
Wyckoff, New Jersey 

 More cities are being added, check here for updates and info on starting a vigil in your city. 

journolist:

National Moment of Silence 2014

On August 14, 2014, citizens across America will gather in solidarity to hold vigils and observe a moment of silence to honor victims of Police Brutality

Police Brutality in the United States continues to be a pervasive problem that affects communities across the country. In recent years, we have had news of too many people losing their lives as a result of police brutality. We have also heard too many stories of people being sexually and otherwise physically assaulted by police. 

We are gathering together to observe a National Moment of Silence to pay respect to the lives lost and/or forever changed by the brutality of the police state.

Too many citizens have suffered. Their families and friends need our positive energy and support in this moment of anger, frustration, fear, and helplessness.

How the #NMOS14 Began

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

Vigils:

Annapolis, Maryland

Atlanta, Georgia

Baltimore, Maryland

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Bloomington, Indiana

Boston, Massachusetts

Bremerton, Washington

Brooklyn, New York

Carson City, Nevada

Charlotte, North Carolina

Chicago, Illinois

Columbia, South Carolina

Columbus, Ohio

Dallas, Texas

Denver, Colorado

Detroit, Michigan

Durham, North Carolina

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Houston, Texas

Indianapolis, Indiana

Kansas City, Missouri

Knoxville, Tennessee  

Lansing, Michigan

Long Island, New York

Los Angeles, California

Lower Manhattan, New York

Memphis, Tennessee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Nashville, Tennessee

New Brunswick, New Jersey

New Orleans, Louisiana

Orlando, Florida

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Portland, Maine

Providence, Rhode Island

Rochester, New York

Salt Lake City, Utah

San Antonio, Texas

San Francisco, California

Seattle, Washington

St. Louis, Missouri

Tampa, Florida

Valdosta, Georgia

Vancouver, Canada

Washington, D.C.

West Palm Beach, Florida

Woodbridge, Virginia

Wyckoff, New Jersey

 More cities are being added, check here for updates and info on starting a vigil in your city.